The Vision (2016~2017) by Tom King & Gabriel Hernandez Walta

‘For a moment, as she listened to her family argue and laugh, Virginia felt content. She belonged here. They belonged here. Everything in the end would be good.

That moment lasted 1.72 seconds.’

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Originally created as a weapon by Ultron, The Vision just wants to be normal. He has extraordinary powers, is a fully-fledged member of the Avengers, but what he most wants is an ordinary human life. So, he creates a family: wife Virginia and twin children Viv and Vin. They move into a house in the suburbs and are welcomed by the neighbours. The twins start attending the local school. Everything seems to be going well. But can it last? Continue reading

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Mad Hatters & March Hares (2017) Ed. by Ellen Datlow

From the book’s Synopsis:

‘Ellen Datlow asked eighteen of the most brilliant and acclaimed writers working today to dream up stories inspired by all the strange events and surreal characters found in Wonderland.’

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Art by Dave McKean

In her introduction, Datlow writes of her love of ‘the Alice books’, especially the many ‘illustrated versions’. A few years ago, she was asked by someone at a convention if there was an ‘anthology idea’ she had always wanted to do. This question led to the creation of this new collection of Alice-inspired short stories: Mad Hatters and March Hares.

Whether you have read the original books or watched one of the numerous film adaptations, you will be very familiar with Alice and the weird and wonderful characters she meets on her journey down the rabbit hole and into Wonderland. How many can you name off the top of your head? Go on, try it!

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Paris Adrift (2018) by E.J. Swift

‘What we were feeds into the things that will become, and after the last memory of us has faded from the world, it is stone that remains to tell what stories it can.’

 

Imagine if you were able to visit Paris at different points in time. And what if your actions could change the future, either for the better or the worse…

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The story opens with a glimpse of a dark dystopian future where survivors of a devastating war are discussing the possibilities of changing the past. Following this, we shift to the present-day where we are introduced to main character Hallie. She is a British university student spending a gap-year living and working in present-day Paris. As we get to know her via her friends and surroundings, a strange encounter with a Japanese woman changes Hallie’s life. Continue reading

The New Voices of Fantasy (2017) Ed. by Peter S. Beagle & Jacob Weisman

‘The New Voices of Fantasy collects the work of nineteen authors of fantasy that Peter S. Beagle and I firmly believe will soon be much better known. […] All of the stories in this book are recent, published after 2010.’ – Jacob Weisman from his Introduction.

 

Short-story collections can often be a mixed bag of good stories as well as not so good ones. After reading The New Voices of Fantasy, I can say that every story in here is worth reading if you have an interest in fantasy or modern fairy tales. Peter S. Beagle is an author I really admire, so seeing his name attached as one of the editors drew me to this volume. I’ve highlighted the stories that stood out the most for me and would love to hear which stories you enjoyed or didn’t enjoy.

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Continue reading

Ack-Ack Macaque (2012) by Gareth L. Powell

I want to start this review with the book’s synopsis because it is a cracker!

 

‘In 1944, as waves of German ninjas parachute into Kent, Britain’s best hopes for victory lie with a Spitfire pilot codenamed ‘Ack-Ack Macaque’. The trouble is, Ack-Ack Macaque is a cynical, one-eyed, cigar-chomping monkey, and he’s starting to doubt everything, including his own existence. A century later, in a world where France and Great Britain merged in the late 1950s and nuclear-powered Zeppelins encircle the globe, ex-journalist Victoria Valois finds herself drawn into a deadly game of cat and mouse with the man who butchered her husband and stole her electronic soul. Meanwhile, in Paris, after taking part in an illegal break-in at a research laboratory, the heir to the British throne goes on the run. And all the while, the doomsday clock ticks towards Armageddon.’

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Ack-Ack Macaque was the joint winner of the 2013 BSFA Best Novel Award along with Anne Leckie’s Ancillary Justice. It is British author Gareth L. Powell’s third novel and is a much-expanded version of his 2007 Interzone reader’s poll-winning short story of the same name. Powell has since penned two highly-rated sequels: Hive Monkey (2014) and Macaque Attack (2015). His latest novel is Embers of War (2018), a space opera which has also been garnering very positive reviews. Continue reading

The Ginger Star (1974) by Leigh Brackett

“The man who doesn’t fear, doesn’t live long. I fear everything.” (p.32)

 

‘Mercury-born Earthman’ Eric John Stark is back! I last encountered him in Brackett’s 1951 short story “Black Amazon of Mars.” That was a very entertaining pulpy space-fantasy adventure which surprised me with its quality of writing and depiction of characters, especially for a short story. (You can read my review here.)

The Ginger Star is the first part of the ‘Book of Skaith’ series. It is followed by The Hounds of Skaith (1974) and The Reavers of Skaith (1976). The story opens with Stark arriving on the planet Skaith, “a lawless sphere at the edge of the known universe.” He is searching for his friend and mentor, Simon Ashton, who was last heard of visiting Skaith on a diplomatic mission for the Galactic Union. Stark is determined not to rest until he finds him.

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1976 Sphere edition; (Artist not credited)

Skaith is an old planet which used to house a thriving culture, but generations of exploitation have left it a dying shadow of its former glory. Its sun, the Ginger Star of the title, is also dying. Stark begins his search in the market city of Skeg, a dangerous place filled with a plethora of unfriendly and distrustful beings. Continue reading

Lovecraft Unbound (2009) Edited by Ellen Datlow

“Something was there.”
Bishop said nothing. He lifted the magazine again, but his eyes were still.
“Something was down there,” Garner said.
“The Crevasse” by Dale Bailey & Nathan Ballingrud

Lovecraft Unbound is a collection of twenty short stories inspired by H.P. Lovecraft’s weird fiction. In her introduction, Ellen Datlow writes that she was looking for stories that were “subtly Lovecraftian” rather than the more obvious “pastiches” that make up a lot of Lovecraft-themed anthologies:

I asked for stories inspired—thematically and possibly—by plot points in Lovecraft’s mythos. What I wanted was variety: in tone, setting, point of view, time.

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This volume includes stories by Laird Barron, Caitlin R. Kiernan, Lavie Tidhar, Michael Chabon, Joyce Carrol Oates, Michael Cisco, Michael Shea and more. Out of the twenty, the following six stories stood out for me: Continue reading