Count Zero (1986) by William Gibson

“Eyes open, he pulled the thing from his socket and held it, his palm slick with sweat. It was like waking from a nightmare. Not a screamer, where impacted fears took on simple, terrible shapes, but the sort of dream, infinitely more disturbing, where everything is utterly wrong …” (p.30)

 

Count Zero is the second book in Gibson’s Sprawl trilogy. It is not a direct sequel to Neuromancer, but it does develop some of the themes and ideas Gibson used in his seminal first novel. It’s a more mature, more ambitious work than Neuromancer, telling the stories of three main characters: Turner, a mercenary-for-hire; Bobby, a young console-cowboy; and Marly, a former art gallery owner.

2006 Ace Books edition

Like its predecessor, Count Zero is not an easy read. Gibson has no time for info-dumps, being a proponent of the “show, don’t tell” school of storytelling. This means we are dropped into the middle of the author’s universe and need to hit the ground running as we try to keep up. It can be challenging at times, and may require a few re-reads of parts of the book, but it is so worth it. Continue reading

Advertisements

The Best Science Fiction and Fantasy of the Year: Volume Eleven (2017) by Jonathan Strahan (Editor)

As the unreality readings spike, the ghost by her side becomes sharper and sharper,
– “A Salvaging of Ghosts” by Aliette de Bodard, (Loc 2088)

 

Jonathan Strahan’s latest collection of the best science fiction and fantasy stories of the year features 28 short stories from 2016. His selected stories include works of hard sci-fi, space opera, dystopia, alternate history, future noir, cyberpunk, steampunk, fantasy, grimdark, and reimagined fairy tales. Such a wide range of short stories makes this an ideal collection for readers who are looking for variety in their speculative fiction. And the talent on display is quite staggering.

Volume Eleven includes two Nebula Award-nominated short stories: “Things with Beards” by Sam J. Miller, and “Seasons of Glass and Iron” by Amal El-Mohtar. It also contains the Nebula Award-nominated novelette: “You’ll Surely Drown Here if You Stay” by Alyssa Wong. The remaining 25 stories are by Catherynne M. Valente, Naomi Novik, Paolo Bacigalupi, Joe Abercrombie, Rich Larson, Aliette de Bodard, Daryl Gregory, Alex Irvine, Alice Sola Kim, Seth Dickinson, Carolyn Ives Gilman, Delia Sherman, Genevieve Valentine, Geoff Ryman, Nina Allan, Caitlin R. Kiernan, N.K. Jemisin, Theodora Goss, Lavie Tidhar, Yoon Ha Lee, Paul McAuley, E. Lily Yu, Ken Liu, Ian R. MacLeod, and Charles Yu.

52899

In his introduction, Strahan writes about some of 2016’s SF&F short story trends including the “reaction to climate change,” “the novella boom,” as well as more exposure for “writers from Asian and African nations”. It was nice to see the editor including stories by some of these writers whose names and works I am now familiar with. This has led to a more diverse and entertaining reading experience for me, and gives us some idea of just how much quality there is out there. Continue reading

Europe at Midnight (2015) by Dave Hutchinson

“I still wasn’t sure whether England was in Europe or not; I had the impression that the English would have quite liked to be in Europe so long as they were running it, but weren’t particularly bothered otherwise.” (Loc 4053)

 

51lf7hhe8gl-_sx321_bo1204203200_This is the second book in the Fractured Europe series. The first book, Europe in Autumn, is a terrific read. I was led to it by blogger friends; one of the great things about the book blogosphere. It reads like a cold war spy thriller set in a near-future Europe filled with weapons that could’ve dropped out of a William Gibson Sprawl story. It’s also a very smart book that is peppered with moments of dry humor as well as containing some wonderful descriptions of food.

Europe at Midnight is not a direct sequel to Autumn; it can be read as a standalone story. But if you have read the first Europe book, Midnight will expand your understanding of it. It will also provide background to some of the events and places mentioned in Autumn. This was a bold move by Hutchinson, as he could easily have written a second book that picked up where the first one left off, continuing the adventures of Rudi the chef. Instead, he has opted for originality by broadening his fragmented Europe universe and bringing in new characters. Continue reading

Dark Night: A True Batman Story (2010) by Paul Dini & Eduardo Risso

“I guess I should tell you right now, this is not the kind of story I’m known for: fantasy, action, comedy – though I guess it includes little bits of all of them. Mainly the story is about him. Batman. Or if not about him, he’s a key player in the action.” (p.2)

 

51h5jlch6ul-_sy344_bo1204203200_
This is not a traditional Batman story, but it is a story about Batman. In fact, Batman is one of the characters although he doesn’t fight crime in here. Dark Night: A True Batman Story is a very personal story about Paul Dini, an American writer and producer who is probably most famous for his work on Batman: The Animated Series. He also co-created the character Harley Quinn with artist Bruce Timm.

It is an autobiographical tale focusing on the period in Dini’s life when he was working for Warner Bros. Animation in the 1990s. Walking home one night after a dinner date, he was mugged and violently beaten. It was a harrowing experience for Dini, one which left him with both physical and mental scars. This story can be interpreted as a way of exorcising some of the demons the mugging left him with. Continue reading

The Snow (2004) by Adam Roberts

“The snow started falling on September 6th, […] And at the beginning people were happy.” (p.1)

 

691923Imagine if it started snowing in September and didn’t stop. As the snow piled up deeper and deeper, how would the World governments react? How long would it take before society collapsed? Adam Roberts explores this scenario in his 2004 novel The Snow, a book which starts well but seems to lose its way around halfway through.

Roberts sets his story in present-day London. The main character is Tira, a Londoner who initially reacts the same way as everybody else. She stays at home waiting for it to stop. But when it doesn’t, she decides to go looking for help rather than waiting for help to find her. From here we follow her journey as she attempts to survive the snow. Continue reading

Neuromancer (1984) by William Gibson – A 3rd Reading

“In the nonspace of the matrix, the interior of a given data construct possessed unlimited subjective dimension; a child’s toy calculator, accessed through Case’s Sendai, would have presented limitless gulfs of nothingness hung with a few basic commands.” (p.63)

 

91v4k0v-ljl

Harper Voyager 2015 edition

 

As part of my 2017 William Gibson Read-Along, I reread Neuromancer in February. This was my third time to read it. (I posted a review on this blog in November 2015 after reading it for the second time.) So, this is more of an update than a new review.

Am I crazy to read the same book 3 times? Maybe, maybe not. What I will say is that after my third reading I’ve upped my rating of the novel from 4 to 5 stars. In my opinion, Neuromancer is a staggering piece of fiction that deserves all the praise and plaudits it has picked up since its publication all those years ago. But instead of waffling on with my own thoughts on this seminal work, I will post some quotes about the book by critics and authors made over the last 30+ years. Continue reading

Batman: Night of the Monster Men (2017)

“Mother of — Those things’ll kill us! Get out of my way!” (p.47)

 

Co-written by Steve Orlando, Tom King, Tim Seeley, James Tynion IV. Art by Riley Rossmo, Roge Antonio, Andy MacDonald.

51-jns-hm5l

Graphic Novel Cover by Riley Rossmo

The first crossover storyline from the DC Rebirth titles ‘Batman’, ‘Detective Comics’, and ‘Nightwing’. A massive storm approaches Gotham City, prompting Batman and his newly-formed team to evacuate some of its citizens. At the same time, something is stirring in the city’s morgue, something strange …

This is a Batman Rebirth tale for Halloween. It has huge, sumptuously-designed monsters running amok in Gotham City. Batman, needing all the help he can get, joins forces with a team of heroes including Batwoman, Nightwing, Duke Thomas, Gotham Girl, Spoiler, Orphan, and a reformed(?) Clayface. It is an interesting crew of characters carried over from the recent Detective Comics Rebirth storyline: ‘Rise of the Batmen’.

As the Bat-team pits their fighting skills and wits against the mutant monsters, Gotham’s citizens become increasingly aggressive in their evacuation site. Could this have anything to do with a briefly-glimpsed villain from Batman’s past? Or is it something from the storm that is affecting them? Continue reading