Good Omens (1990) by Terry Pratchett & Neil Gaiman

“Anyway, if you stop tellin’ people it’s all sorted out after they’re dead, they might try sorting it all out while they’re alive. ”

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Cover Artwork by Graham Ward

“She was beautiful, but she was beautiful in the way a forest fire was beautiful: something to be admired from a distance, not up close.”


 

Wow! Is this book already almost thirty years old? I remember buying the first paperback edition back in the days of Gaiman’s Sandman comic book series. In fact, the author used the Sandman’s letters page to announce Good Omens’ release. I remember that, too. So, this is what getting old feels like.

Good Omens is a black-comedy about Armageddon set at the end of the 1980s. Its main characters are an angel, a demon, a witch, a witch-finder, the antichrist and his friends. The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse also feature. It was written by Neil Gaiman, (Sandman, American Gods, Coraline, The Graveyard Book) and Terry Pratchett, (The Discworld series). Continue reading

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Vintage Science Fiction Review Digest #1

Happy New Year everyone!

 

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It’s January 2019, the Year of the Wild Boar, and it’s time for some vintage science fiction.  As mentioned earlier, I’m joining the Little Red Reviewer’s “not-a-challenge” of VintageSciFiMonth.

I’ve started reading Fritz Leiber’s 1958 Hugo Award-winner The Big Time.

“Have you ever worried about your memory, because it doesn’t seem to recall exactly the same past from one day to the next? Have you ever thought that the whole universe might be a crazy, mixed-up dream? If you have, then you’ve had hints of the Change War.”

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I only managed to read a couple of “vintage” SF stories in 2018 so I’m going to make an effort to read more this year.

I’ve been looking through my older reviews starting from 2016 and have found quite a few books that fall under this category. In fact I am amazed at just how many vintage books I read and reviewed in 2016. You can tell how enthusiastic I was back then at getting this blog off the ground. So, without further ado, here are the Vintage Science Fiction and Fantasy stories I read and reviewed in 2016: Continue reading

Father Christmas (1973) by Raymond Briggs

“I saw parallels between Father Christmas’s job and my father’s – he was a milkman. He had to get up very early in the morning and go out in all weathers.  On Christmas morning I’d get up very early to help him.” -Raymond Briggs

Merry Christmas!

I am a huge fan of Raymond Briggs’ Snowman book and the animated film version. I love the colored pencil artwork as well as the touching story imagined from a child’s point of view. The film can be seen on TV every year on either Christmas Eve or Christmas Day in the UK. I miss watching it now that I live in Japan. Continue reading

January is “Vintage Science Fiction Month”

This is a yearly reading event held by the Little Red Reviewer, which she started in 2012. She also stresses this is “Not-a-Challenge!” Basically, it’s a chance to read some of the many older science fiction works that are out there. Then write or comment about them on the web. It’s also a great chance to interact with fellow bloggers and science fiction and fantasy readers.

Here’s the Little Red Reviewer:

“My definition of Vintage is anything before 1979, and my definition of Scifi is pretty loose: scifi, sci-fantasy, sword and sorcery, robots, magical swords, near future, far future, pulp scifi adventure, satire, War of the Worlds, Jules Verne, Mary Shelley. . .”

Continue reading

Graphic Novels Digest #1

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Batman and Son (2007) by Grant Morrison, Andy Kubert & Jesse Delperdang

Batman discovers he has a son called Damian. And Commissioner Gordon has been poisoned by the Joker!  Could this be a bad omen for the Dark Knight?

Wow, is it already 11 years since this first came out? I was still buying the Batman comic book back then and I remember Grant Morrison taking over the writing duties. Love him or not, his writing is rarely ordinary and never dull.

 

I enjoyed this back in 2006~2007 and I’ve really enjoyed re-reading it. It’s exciting, clever and laced with black humour. The ninja man-bats are a brilliant idea! I also respect Morrison for writing Damian the way he did. His initial interactions with Alfred and Tim Drake’s Robin are priceless. Hate him or love him, he’s a compelling character. I’ll leave you to enjoy this story without spoiling any more.

This comes highly recommended. Continue reading

Europe in Winter (2016) by Dave Hutchinson

Imagine a train line which grew out of a pocket universe and spread across a fractured Europe. Now imagine this “Line” being its own state with borders and so on. Are you still with me?

‘The Line had been decades in the building. It had originally aspired to being a straight line drawn across Europe and Asia, […] Geography and simple pragmatism meant that this was never achievable,’

 

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Background

The third book in Dave Hutchinson’s Fractured Europe series, Europe in Winter continues the adventures of Rudi, ‘the former chef-turned-spy.’ It begins with a deadly terrorist attack on a train and ends with a staggering “sleight of hand” at a major international airport. In between, the author takes us on a snaking journey around Eastern Europe as we meet a motley cast of characters who could be working for any side. Confused yet? You will be! Continue reading

Breathmoss and Other Exhalations (2004) by Ian R. MacLeod

In his introduction to Breathmoss and Other Exhalations, Ian R. MacLeod offers his definition of the stories he desires to tell:

“stories that make us think, stories which surprise us not because they’re showing us something new, but because they’re revealing through a lie’s tilted mirror something we suddenly realize with that lovely rush of recognition we’ve known all along.”

 

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Cover Artwork by Bob Eggleton

Continue reading