Hammers on Bone (2016) by Cassandra Khaw

“My face is older than I remember, the lines longer, more entrenched in coarse brown skin. Puckered flesh details a history in bullet wounds, knife scars, burns. Ugly but human.” (p.75)

 

Hammers on Bone is a 2016 novella by Cassandra Khaw, the creator of Rupert Wong, Cannibal Chef. It’s her first story to feature John Persons, a private investigator based in Croydon, South London. You could describe Persons as a Transformer-detective because there’s more to him than meets the eye. To say any more would be to spoil a fascinating plot device that Khaw uses. His latest client is a ten-year-old boy who has an unusual job for the PI. Continue reading

Mightier than the Sword (2017) by K.J. Parker

“Speaking as a military man, I despise fighting against lunatics. I’ve done it once or twice, and it sets your teeth on edge. You can’t predict what they’ll do, …” (Loc 570)

 

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Cover by Vincent Chong

When the Empress is your aunt, you’ve got to do what she says, even if you don’t like it. K.J. Parker’s latest novella pits an unnamed narrator against “the Land and Sea Raiders”, a group of mysterious pirates who have been attacking the land’s monasteries. We are told a brief history of encounters with the raiders, but until now, no-one has been able to discover exactly who they are or where they’re from.

“Our first experience of them was seventy long, high-castled warships suddenly appearing off Vica Bay. The governor […] sent a message to their leader inviting him to lunch. He came, and brought some friends; it was sixty years before Vica was rebuilt,” (Loc 129)

Continue reading

Way Down Dark (2015) by J.P. Smythe

“And then the lights go dim. Every day, fifteen hours they’re bright, then nine hours they’re dim. That’s how we know day from night; how we know it’s time to sleep. It’s also how the worst parts of the ship know to come alive.” (Loc 572)

 

The first part of J.P. Smythe’s Australia trilogy, Way Down Dark, tells the story of Chan, a teenage girl living on board a spaceship called “Australia”. The ship, we are told, left a dying Earth many years before and is searching for a new home for its large crew of “inhabitants”. Over time, the people on Australia have split into four separate groups: the Bells, the Pale Women, the Free People, and the Lows.

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Each group lives together in their own segregated zones on the ship. The Bells are descended from genetically engineered soldiers. The Pale Women are a religious group who keep themselves apart from the other groups. Chan is a member of the Free People, the most democratic of the groups; her mother is its leader.  The Lows are brutal fighters who care little for the rest of the crew, and are looking to expand by any means necessary. Continue reading

Mount Tbr – July 2017

The dreaded mountain that is my tbr pile continues to grow. Some of these titles have been there for a while, some are fairly recent additions.

Fifteen books. That doesn’t sound too bad, does it? But this is just my physical tbr mountain. My kindle tbr pile contains another 20 titles demanding my attention. Curse those special offers and double-curse my weak will. No one’s forcing me to buy them, right?

I’m going to attempt a month of tbr-only reading. What I’d like to know is which 3 titles would you choose to read? Please leave a comment below:) Also, if you’ve already read one or more of these books, which would you recommend I read next?

Thanks for reading!

Providence: Act 1 (2017) by Alan Moore and Jacen Burrows

“Still casting around for ideas, I took another look at Leticia Wheatley’s crayon drawings. I confess that I hadn’t really paid them much attention beyond observing that they looked like the work of somebody who was mentally disturbed,” (p. 156)

 

Providence: Act 1 collects issues #1-4 of the twelve-issue Avatar comic book penned by Alan Moore with art by Jacen Burrows. Opening in New York during the summer of 1919, we experience the story through the eyes of Robert Black, a reporter for the New York Herald. Black sets out to explore a lead on a scandal concerning an infamous book, “Sous le Monde,” which allegedly sent some of its readers insane. His initial inquiries lead him to the apartment of one Doctor Alvarez, a local doctor with a strange health condition which forces him to keep his apartment permanently chilled. Continue reading

The Changeling (2017) by Victor LaValle

“This fairy tale begins in 1968 during a garbage strike.” (Loc 102)

 

9780812995947The Changeling is an adult fairy tale by American author Victor LaValle. Last year, I read his 2016 novella The Ballard of Black Tom, a reimagining of H.P. Lovecraft’s short story The Horror at Red Hook (1927). It was an impressive, very readable story which depicted the events of the original, infamously-racist Lovecraft tale from a different character’s perspective. LaValle’s 2009 novel Big Machine won the Shirley Jackson Award. He has also written a collection of short stories Slapboxing with Jesus (1999), and the novels The Ecstatic (2002) and The Devil in Silver (2012).

Recently married couple, Apollo Kagwa and Emma Valentine, lives in New York. Emma is a librarian and Apollo a used bookseller. After the birth of their son, Brian, life seems good as they both enjoy adapting to parenthood. LaValle takes his time setting the scene of this young couple’s life, revealing their characters in the tiny details: Emma’s difficulties with breastfeeding, and Apollo’s penchant for uploading blurry baby-pics onto Facebook. But after some unexplainable images start appearing on their smartphones, a staggering event takes place in their apartment turning Apollo and Emma’s’ world on its head. Continue reading

Doom Patrol Vol.1: Brick by Brick (2017) by Gerard Way & Nick Derington

“Engage neurotic pain amplifier! Bypass settings one through four and begin at “Disorienting Agony”!” (p.77)

 

31855861After first appearing in 1963, the Doom Patrol has undergone various interpretations by different writers and artists over the years. The most famous one is probably Grant Morrison’s run on the comic when he took over writing duties in 1989. He was joined by artist Richard Case. Morrison wrote 45 issues of Doom Patrol before leaving for pastures new.

I was a fan at the time and remember thinking this was unlike any comic I had read before. Morrison’s narrative dealt with surrealism, psychotherapy, chaos magick, sexual identity, disability, multiple personalities, and more. One of his storylines was about a painting that ate Paris, instigated by the Brotherhood of Dada – a group of super villains named after the avant-garde art movement. Who says comics are just for kids?… I’m listening… Continue reading