Lovecraft Unbound (2009) Edited by Ellen Datlow

“Something was there.”
Bishop said nothing. He lifted the magazine again, but his eyes were still.
“Something was down there,” Garner said.
“The Crevasse” by Dale Bailey & Nathan Ballingrud

Lovecraft Unbound is a collection of twenty short stories inspired by H.P. Lovecraft’s weird fiction. In her introduction, Ellen Datlow writes that she was looking for stories that were “subtly Lovecraftian” rather than the more obvious “pastiches” that make up a lot of Lovecraft-themed anthologies:

I asked for stories inspired—thematically and possibly—by plot points in Lovecraft’s mythos. What I wanted was variety: in tone, setting, point of view, time.

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This volume includes stories by Laird Barron, Caitlin R. Kiernan, Lavie Tidhar, Michael Chabon, Joyce Carrol Oates, Michael Cisco, Michael Shea and more. Out of the twenty, the following six stories stood out for me: Continue reading

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Hellboy: Wake the Devil (1996) by Mike Mignola

“I sought the dark behind the stars.”


Wake the Devil
follows on from the first Hellboy mini-series, Seed of Destruction. Written and drawn by Mike Mignola, this five-part story takes Hellboy from a wax museum in New York to an ancient Romanian castle. He is on the trail of the missing corpse of a nobleman who was rumored to have worked with Hitler during WWII. Assisted by BPRD agents Abe Sapien and Liz Sherman, Hellboy must uncover the conspiracy behind the theft of the body and shed light on his own mysterious beginnings.

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The Nazis from Seed of Destruction are back. This time they are planning to resurrect a Romanian vampire in the hope of creating an army of bloodsuckers. The Bureau for Paranormal Research & Defense gets wind of the plan and sends Hellboy with a couple of agents to investigate. Their journey will take them across the world to Eastern Europe where powerful and deadly forces lie in wait. Continue reading

RIP XII Challenge

I’m a sucker for a reading challenge, especially when it coincides with one of my own. The last two years in October, I’ve taken my own *All Hallow’s Read challenge (*from an idea by Neil Gaiman). I limit my October reading choices to tales of the supernatural.

Two years ago, I read Richard Matheson’s Hell House and Stephen King’s The Shining. Last year, I chose Broken Monsters by Lauren Beukes, Bag of Bones by King, again, and Nightmare Magazine#37: Queers Destroy Horror!

This year, I am joining the R.eaders I.mbibing P.eril XII Challenge which runs from September 1st to October 31st. Here is a link to the sign-up page. Continue reading

Hammers on Bone (2016) by Cassandra Khaw

“My face is older than I remember, the lines longer, more entrenched in coarse brown skin. Puckered flesh details a history in bullet wounds, knife scars, burns. Ugly but human.” (p.75)

 

Hammers on Bone is a 2016 novella by Cassandra Khaw, the creator of Rupert Wong, Cannibal Chef. It’s her first story to feature John Persons, a private investigator based in Croydon, South London. You could describe Persons as a Transformer-detective because there’s more to him than meets the eye. To say any more would be to spoil a fascinating plot device that Khaw uses. His latest client is a ten-year-old boy who has an unusual job for the PI. Continue reading

Providence: Act 1 (2017) by Alan Moore and Jacen Burrows

“Still casting around for ideas, I took another look at Leticia Wheatley’s crayon drawings. I confess that I hadn’t really paid them much attention beyond observing that they looked like the work of somebody who was mentally disturbed,” (p. 156)

 

Providence: Act 1 collects issues #1-4 of the twelve-issue Avatar comic book penned by Alan Moore with art by Jacen Burrows. Opening in New York during the summer of 1919, we experience the story through the eyes of Robert Black, a reporter for the New York Herald. Black sets out to explore a lead on a scandal concerning an infamous book, “Sous le Monde,” which allegedly sent some of its readers insane. His initial inquiries lead him to the apartment of one Doctor Alvarez, a local doctor with a strange health condition which forces him to keep his apartment permanently chilled. Continue reading

The Changeling (2017) by Victor LaValle

“This fairy tale begins in 1968 during a garbage strike.” (Loc 102)

 

9780812995947The Changeling is an adult fairy tale by American author Victor LaValle. Last year, I read his 2016 novella The Ballard of Black Tom, a reimagining of H.P. Lovecraft’s short story The Horror at Red Hook (1927). It was an impressive, very readable story which depicted the events of the original, infamously-racist Lovecraft tale from a different character’s perspective. LaValle’s 2009 novel Big Machine won the Shirley Jackson Award. He has also written a collection of short stories Slapboxing with Jesus (1999), and the novels The Ecstatic (2002) and The Devil in Silver (2012).

Recently married couple, Apollo Kagwa and Emma Valentine, lives in New York. Emma is a librarian and Apollo a used bookseller. After the birth of their son, Brian, life seems good as they both enjoy adapting to parenthood. LaValle takes his time setting the scene of this young couple’s life, revealing their characters in the tiny details: Emma’s difficulties with breastfeeding, and Apollo’s penchant for uploading blurry baby-pics onto Facebook. But after some unexplainable images start appearing on their smartphones, a staggering event takes place in their apartment turning Apollo and Emma’s’ world on its head. Continue reading

Broken Monsters (2014) by Lauren Beukes

“Kids can’t cope with the darkness, supposedly, but how else are we supposed to wrestle with it? How else are we supposed to prepare for this moment when you have to open the door not knowing what’s behind it?” (p.250)

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Lauren Beukes is a South African writer who was recommended to me when I was compiling a list of essential books to read by female authors. Three of her works were suggested by blogger friends: Moxyland (2008), Zoo City (2010), and Broken Monsters (2014). She also wrote the 2013 time-travel thriller The Shining Girls, which I have heard very good things about. After reading Broken Monsters, I’m keen to read more of her writing.

Broken Monsters is a serial-killer thriller with supernatural undertones set in modern Detroit. Detective Gabi Versado leads the search for a killer after the mutilated body of a young boy is found on the street. On the wall beside the body is a simple chalk drawing of a door. As the hunt for the killer continues, the author takes us on a tour of some of the darker places of this struggling city, introducing a group of characters who initially seem unrelated. Continue reading