The Poet in the Hologram in the Middle of Prime Time (1972) by Ed Bryant

“That’s right, friends! Imagine yourself the star of your own show in your own home! All you need is the fantastic new Twenty-Twenty holovision plan, available only from UniCom.”

 

I read this short story in Nova 2 (1972) edited by Harry Harrison. I will be working my way through this anthology as part of my Short Story Tarot Challenge.

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Cover Art by Enrico Scull

Brief Summary
Ransom is a struggling poet who makes a living writing ‘holovision’ shows for a huge corporation. He lives in a ‘labyrinthian apartment block’ in a polluted city where windows ‘stay permanently shut.’ He hates writing scripts for UniCom and is hatching a plan to break free from its soulless grip. Continue reading

Shang-Chi, Master of Kung Fu

‘Call me Shang-Chi, as my father did, when he raised me and molded my mind and my body in the vacuum of his Honan, China, retreat. I learned many things from my father: that my name means “The Rising and Advancing of a Spirit,” that my body could be forged into a living weapon through the discipline of Kung Fu, and that it might be used for the murder of a man called Dr. Petrie.

Since then, I have learned that my father is Dr. Fu Manchu, the most insidiously evil man on earth … and that to honor him would bring nothing but dishonor to the spirit of my name.’

 

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Cover art of Special Marvel Edition #15 (December 1973)

 

Riding on the wave of the Bruce Lee-inspired Kung Fu craze in the 1970s, Marvel Comics launched the character Shang-Chi, Master of Kung Fu in 1973. He was created by writer Steve Englehart and artist Jim Starlin and made his first appearance in Special Marvel Edition #15, cover-dated December 1973. He appeared again in issue #16, and with issue #17 (April 1974) the title changed its name to The Hands of Shang-Chi: Master of Kung Fu. The series was a success and continued for ten years until the final issue #125, dated June 1983. Continue reading